CHOOSE TO PLAY

Karamba Parrot
×
Deposit
You are currently playing with an available Bonus Balance. This is in line with the Bonus Policy you accepted, please revert to our Bonus Policy for more information.
Game Search
Search results will show as you type

    Euro 2020 – Football fever to sweep the continent

    The Action is on - All eyes turn to the international stage, and Euro 20!

    Following the conclusion of the domestic season – with all the major football leagues in Europe decided, as well as the winners of the Champions League and Europa League now known – all eyes turn to the international stage, and Euro 2020.
    Of course, whilst cancelled last year amidst the pandemic, this special edition of the tournament – which is being multi-hosted by no fewer than 11 European cities – is set to spark an exciting summer of sport.
    Read on to find out everything you need to know about this year’s competition – and we’ll be keeping you updated as the tournament progresses too!

    Get some facts about the Euro 20 :

     

     

    BET HERE

     

    Introduction

    With the domestic season having drawn to a close, football fans are champing at the bit to feast their eyes on some top-level international action.
    Of course, whilst cancelled last year amidst the pandemic, this special edition of the tournament – which is being multi-hosted by no fewer than 11 European cities – is set to spark an exciting summer of sport.
    Read on to find out everything you need to know about this year’s competition – and we’ll be keeping you updated as the tournament progresses too!


    Euro 2020 update: the final four are revealed

    We are just three matches away from seeing who will be crowned European Champions, as Wembley Stadium hosts the action from here on in. The semi-finalists have been revealed, with Italy vs Spain on Tuesday night, followed by England vs Denmark on Wednesday. Let’s take a quick look at our final four.

    Italy vs Spain

    Luis Enrique’s side were the first through to the semis. A Denis Zakaria own goal put them ahead in Saint Petersburg, but overachievers Switzerland – who had previously knocked out France – managed to pull back a goal in the second half, through Xherdan Shaqiri. It remained honours even after the regulatory 90 minutes, and subsequent 30 minutes of extra time – with penalties the decider. A fairly shocking shootout in which more spot-kicks were saved than scored, Spain ran out 4-2 winners.

    Italy have looked unstoppable so far, and their 32-match unbeaten run is a national record. After a slight hiccup in the last-16 over Austria, they found themselves cruising over Belgium – who are ranked number 1 in the world. Nicolò Barella opened the scoring, before Lorenzo Insigne added a second – in what is being tipped as one of the goals of the tournament. While Belgium pulled one back through Romelu Lukaku’s penalty, after Giovanni di Lorenzo brought down Jeremy Doku, the Azzurri held on.

    Between them, Italy and Spain have won five World Cups and four European Championships – and the pair have met at the last three editions of the Euros. Their most recent encounter was in the last 16, in which Italy ran out 2-0 winners and given their form, discount them at your peril!

    England vs Denmark

    After a highly impressive win over Germany in the last-16, England continued their good form over Ukraine – although victory was never in any doubt. Despite overachieving to reach the quarter-final, Ukraine were hugely out of their depth in Rome, as England opened the scoring in just the 4th minute. Harry Kane later went on to grab a brace, while Harry Maguire got on the scoresheet and Jordan Henderson landed his first international goal. The Three Lions duly delivered and this new-found confidence and abundance of goals will stand them in good stead into the semis.

    Denmark, however, have had a rollercoaster ride in the tournament – and will be looking for their fairytale to continue. A two-goal lead against the Czech Republic, when Thomas Delaney and Kasper Dolberg put them ahead, was cut in the second half by Patrik Schick’s 5th goal of the tournament. But that Nordic warrior spirit continues to live on and the Danes aren’t ready to give up on their European journey just yet.

    After failing to qualify for Euro 2016, and given the shock that surrounded their opening match against Finland, Kasper Hjulmand can be truly proud of his side’s achievements. But will this be the end of the road?

    After almost two weeks of rip-roaring football, the Euro 2020 group stage has now come to an end, and there was plenty of drama in the last round of fixtures. We now know the 16 teams who will battle it out in the knockout stage to try and get their hands on that trophy. But it’s worth taking a look back at how things worked out in the group stage.

    Having contested the opening game of the tournament against Turkey and won 3-0, Italy were one of the standout teams from the first round of Euro 2020. Following that win over Turkey in Rome, they beat Switzerland 3-0 and Wales 1-0 to enjoy a perfect record, without even conceding a goal. Wales and Switzerland joined them in advancing from Group A.

    There was a similarly comfortable passage to the knockout stage for Belgium in Group B. They won all three of their matches, leaving an almighty scrap for second place. In the end it was Denmark who claimed it, beating Russia 4-1 in the last round of fixtures.

    Played three, won three was how the Netherlands’ group efforts finished as well. They survived a scare to beat Ukraine 3-2 in their opening game, but then enjoyed comfortable wins over Austria and North Macedonia. The Austrians and the Ukrainians also progressed to the last 16.

    England finished top of Group D despite failing to find their top gear in the group stage. A 0-0 draw with Scotland was sandwiched between 1-0 victories over Croatia and the Czech Republic, with the latter two teams also doing enough to earn a place in the knockout stage.

    Group E was expected to be dominated by Spain, but Luis Enrique’s side didn’t get going in their opening two matches, drawing with Sweden and Poland. The Swedes duly took advantage and topped the group following hard-fought wins over Slovakia and Poland, while Spain secured second with a resounding 5-0 win over the Slovaks in Seville.

    With three quality sides in the shape of France, Germany and Portugal, along with plucky underdogs Hungary who had home advantage on their side, Group D was dubbed the group of death before the tournament. In the end it was France who emerged on top, beating Germany before drawing with Hungary and Portugal. The Germans and the Portuguese both progressed after a night of drama to cap the group off.

    Attention now turns to the last 16, and with plenty of mouth-watering ties to look forward to, there’s no doubt that the best is yet to come at Euro 2020.

    Round of 16 schedule

    Saturday 26th June
    Wales v Denmark – Amsterdam
    Italy v Austria – London

    Sunday 27th June
    Netherlands v Czech Republic – Budapest
    Belgium v Portugal – Seville

    Monday 28th June
    Croatia v Spain – Copenhagen
    France v Switzerland – Bucharest

    Tuesday 29th June
    England v Germany – London
    Sweden v Ukraine – Glasgow


    The hosts

    For the first time in the tournament’s history, it’s being pan-hosted. We’ve never seen more than two nations share the duties – it’s going to be a proper European tour! Where can you expect to see matches played?

    • Wembley Stadium – London, England (capacity: 90,000)
    • Stadio Olimpico – Rome, Italy (capacity: 70,634)
    • Allianz Arena – Munich, Germany (capacity: 70,000)
    • Olympic Stadium – Baku, Azerbaijan (capacity: 68,700)
    • Krestovsky Stadium – Saint Petersburg, Russia (capacity: 68,134)
    • Puskás Aréna – Budapest, Hungary (capacity: 67,215)
    • La Cartuja – Seville, Spain (capacity: 60,000)
    • Arena Națională – Bucharest, Romania (capacity: 55,600)
    • Johan Cruyff Arena – Amsterdam, the Netherlands (capacity: 54,990)
    • Hampden Park – Glasgow, Scotland (capacity: 51,866)
    • Parken Stadium – Copenhagen, Denmark (capacity: 38,605)

    Of course, with the current rules and regulations varying from country to country, it’s likely that no stadium will be at full capacity during the tournament. If you’re wondering how many fans will be allowed into the stadiums, the answer is that it is likely to be between 22-and-50%.
    But as we have seen at other football matches and other sporting events, it’s great to have the fans back – even if they are in smaller numbers than usual. You can guarantee that patriotism will be in abundance, with fans waving flags and scarfs, wearing their team’s shirt with pride – and maybe even sporting a dab or two of face paint! Euro fever will sweep the continent once more!

     

    The matches

    Each city will host three group stage matches, and in the knockout stages; either a match in the round of 16, or a quarter-final. Saint Petersburg is the exception, and the Krestovsky Stadium will host six group stage matches – three in Group B (Russia’s group), and three in Group E.

    Each city will host three group stage matches, and in the knockout stages; either a match in the round of 16, or a quarter-final. Saint Petersburg is the exception, and the Krestovsky Stadium will host six group stage matches – three in Group B (Russia’s group), and three in Group E. Wembley Stadium will also host all the matches in the latter stages the tournament. The full breakdown is below:
    • Wembley Stadium – Group stage, round of 16, semi-finals, and final
    • Stadio Olimpico, Allianz Arena, Olympic Stadium, and Krestovsky Stadium – Group stage, and quarter-final
    • Puskás Aréna, La Cartuja, Arena Națională, Johan Cruyff Arena, Hampden Park, and Parken Stadium – Group stage, and round of 16

    BET HERE

     

    The groups

    Group A
    Italy

    – Host nation
    – Ranked 7th in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 1968
    – 2016 finish: quarter-finals (lost to Germany)
    Switzerland
    – Ranked 13th in the world
    – Best finish: round of 16 in 2016
    – 2016 finish: round of 16 (lost to Poland)
    Turkey
    – Ranked 29th in the world
    – Best finish: semi-finals in 2008
    – 2016 finish: group stage
    Wales
    – Ranked 17th in the world
    – Best finish: semi-finals in 2016
    – 2016 finish: semi-finals (lost to Portugal)

    Group B
    Belgium

    – Ranked 1st in the world
    – Best finish: runners-up in 1980
    – 2016 finish: quarter-finals (lost to Wales)
    Denmark
    – Host nation
    – Ranked 10th in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 1992
    – 2016 finish: did not qualify
    Finland
    – Ranked 54th in the world
    – Making their European Championships debut
    Russia
    – Host nation
    – Ranked 38th in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 1960 (as Soviet Union)
    – 2016 finish: group stage

    Group C
    Austria

    – Ranked 23rd in the world
    – Best finish: group stages in 2008 and 2016
    – 2016 finish: group stage
    Netherlands
    – Host nation
    – Ranked 16th in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 1988
    – 2016 finish: did not qualify
    North Macedonia
    – Ranked 62nd in the world
    – Making their European Championships debut
    Ukraine
    – Ranked 24th in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 1960 (as Soviet Union)
    – 2016 finish: group stage

    Group D
    Croatia

    – Ranked 14th in the world
    – Best finish: quarter-finals in 1996 and 2008
    – 2016 finish: round of 16 (lost to Portugal)
    Czech Republic
    – Ranked 40th in the world
    – Best finish: semi-finals in 2004
    – 2016 finish: group stage
    England
    – Host nation
    – Ranked 4th in the world
    – Best finish: semi-finals in 1996
    – 2016 finish: round of 16 (lost to Iceland)
    Scotland
    – Host nation
    – Ranked 44th in the world
    – Best finish: group stages in 1992 and 1996
    – 2016 finish: did not qualify

    Group E
    Poland

    – Ranked 21st in the world
    – Best finish: quarter-finals in 2016
    – 2016 finish: quarter-final (lost to Portugal)
    Slovakia
    – Ranked 36th in the world
    – Best finish: round of 16 in 2016
    – 2016 finish: round of 16 (lost to Germany)
    Spain
    – Host nation
    – Ranked 6th in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 1964, 2008 and 2012
    – 2016 finish: round of 16 (lost to Italy)
    Sweden
    – Ranked 18th in the world
    – Best finish: semi-finals in 1992
    – 2016 finish: group stage

    Group F
    France
    – Ranked 2nd in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 1984 and 2000
    – 2016 finish: runners-up (lost to Portugal)
    Germany
    – Host nation
    – Ranked 12th in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 1972, 1980 and 1996
    – 2016 finish: semi-final (lost to France)
    Hungary
    – Ranked 37th in the world
    – Best finish: third place in 1964
    – 2016 finish: round of 16 (lost to Belgium)
    Portugal
    – Host nation
    – Ranked 5th in the world
    – Best finish: champions in 2016
    – 2016 finish: champions

     

    The ones to watch

    Nations

    If you’re looking to find the outright favourites to win Euro 2020, you can’t look beyond France. Admittedly, they have been placed in the proverbial group of death, alongside Germany and current European champions, Portugal. But Didier Deschamps’ side are the reigning world champions, and were runners up, when they hosted Euro 2016.
    Under Gareth Southgate, England fared well in Russia. After the debacle that was losing to Iceland in the round of 16 at Euro 2016, the Three Lions went on to reach the semi-finals at the World Cup – losing to Croatia, after extra time. The two are set to meet again in Group D, and there’s no denying England will want to exact revenge on their opponents.
    Belgium have been riding the crest of a wave, under Roberto Martinez. The Spanish coach led them to their best finish at the 2018 World Cup – eventually winning their third-place play-off against England. Currently ranked number 1 in the world by FIFA, they will undoubtedly look to spark another surprise on the pan-hosted tournament.

    Goalscorers

     

    Equally as exciting as who will win the tournament, is who will end up receiving the prize of the Golden Boot. Looking at the latest market, England’s Harry Kane is the favourite. The striker, who plays domestic football for Tottenham Hotspur, netted 23 goals last season and was awarded as the Premier League’s Golden Boot. He currently has 34 goals in 53 appearances for the Three Lions.
    Belgium’s Romelu Lukaku knows where the goal is. The striker notched 23 times last season as Inter Milan won their first Scudetto in 10 years, and he finished behind Cristiano Ronaldo in Serie A’s top goalscorers tally. He’s scored 59 goals in 91 appearances for his country – and while the future of his domestic career is uncertain, a decent showing for the 28-year-old, will cause Europe’s elite to sit up and watch.
    And don’t rule out Kylian Mbappé, of France. Making his international debut at the tender age of 18, he went on to become the youngest French player to score at a World Cup (in 2018). Scoring 27 goals for Paris Saint-Germain in Ligue 1 last season, saw the 22-year-old awarded with the Golden Boot for a second time. One of the brightest young talents in football, we believe he’ll get a chance to shine. He currently has 16 goals in 42 appearances for Les Bleus.

     

    BET HERE
    Copyright 2021- All Rights Reserved. Karamba.com is a brand owned by ASG Technologies Ltd, a company incorporated under the laws of British Virgin Islands. The games on this website are powered and operated by Aspire Global International LTD, a Malta based company with registration number C42296 and having registered office at 135, High street, Sliema SLM 1548, Malta, which is a fully licensed operator under the Remote Gaming Regulations of Malta MGA/CRP/148/2007 issued on the 17 August 2009 (this license incorporates the previous licenses held by the Company and list the old license numbers with their license dates) and regulated by the Malta Gaming Authority. Aspire Global International LTD have an Irish Betting License with license reference number 1014834. In Great Britain , the games on this website are operated by AG Communications Limited, a Malta based company with registration number C48328 and having registered office at 135, High street, Sliema SLM 1549, Malta, which is licensed and regulated by the United Kingdom Gambling Commission (Under account number: 39483). The current status of operators license can be found at: Gambling Commission.

    Gambling can be addictive, please play responsibly
    Please contact:
    https://www.begambleaware.org/ and  0808 8020 133 (UK)
    https://www.problemgambling.ie/ and 089 241 5401 (Ireland)
    promotion